Studio M

Judi Krew: Hoard Couture, Where Art Meets Fashion

Judi Krew: Hoard Couture, Where Art Meets Fashion is on exhibit in the Massillon Museum’s Studio M from August 21 through October 6, 2021.

Since 2012, this ongoing wearable art series, under the trademarked name “Hoard Couture,” has used clothing design to creatively display personal collection objects, explore contemporary social issues, and work with unconventional materials as textiles. The artist embraces the mantra “reuse, repurpose, reconsider, and reimagine” to guide her concept of each piece.

A reception will be held for the artist in Studio M on Saturday, August 28, from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. The extended hours coordinate with Massillon’s Last Saturday event. 

MassMu will post a podcast interview with Judi Krew on Tuesday, September 21, at noon. To listen to the podcast, click here.

Krew has been a working artist since 1982, when she graduated with honors in art from the University of Akron. She earned a masters degree in art education in a dual program from Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Institute of Art.

She has worked in visual merchandising, museum education, and high school art education. An active community volunteer, she maintains a successful exhibition career and a studio in Canton. 

In addition to Hoard Couture, Krew has produced The Woman Series, acrylics, 1999–2014; Fascinating Faces from Interesting Places, pastels, 2010–2014; and continuing the Botanicals series, acrylics, since 2014. She has designed award-winning floats for the Pro Football Hall of Fame Grand Parade, patches for the Boy Scouts of America, and elaborate décor for major fundraising galas.

For her community efforts, Krew earned the Silver Beaver from Buckeye Council BSA (2016), the Woman of the Year Presidential Award from the Junior League (2019), and alumni hall of fame awards from Brecksville Broadview Heights High School and the University of Akron. She was inducted into the Canton YWCA Women’s Hall of Fame in 2018.

Visitors to the Krew exhibition can also see A Thrilling Act: The Art of Anthony Eterovich in the Aultman Health Foundation Gallery (through September 26, 2021), Photography by Supporters of Relay for Life (through September 8, 2021) in the Fred F. Silk Community Room Gallery, Flu and Football and the Paul Brown/Massillon Tiger timeline in the Paul Brown Museum, and Eterovich’s Contemporaries in the Flex Gallery. Exhibitions in the Local History Gallery, Albert E. Hise Fine and Decorative Arts Gallery, Photography Gallery, and Immel Circus are always on display.

Studio M is a dedicated space made available by the Museum’s expansion project to exhibit the work of contemporary artists. The gallery hosts eight exhibitions each year.

The Massillon Museum receives operating support from the Ohio Arts Council and ArtsinStark, as well as marketing support from Visit Canton.

Exhibitions can be seen during regular MassMu hours, Tuesday through Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday 2:00 to 5:00 p.m.  The Museum extends its hours, 5:00 to 7:00 p.m., on the last Saturday of each month to participate in Massillon’s Last Saturday. 

MassMu is located at 121 Lincoln Way East in downtown Massillon. A visit is always free. Free parking is available on adjacent streets and in nearby city lots. For more information, call 330-833-4061.

World Adventure Ceremonial Gown

Paper, denim remnant, bedsheet, pillow covers, glass, 2020

Here’s what the artist writes about this piece:

This elaborate garment borrows design elements from the ceremonial dress of various cultures throughout the world, both ancient and modern. Each “feather” is one full sheet of scrapbooking paper, deconstructed from flower-like centerpieces used for a long-ago hospital fundraiser.  Paper is extremely heavy, so an internal structure of cross supports helps counter the weight for when the garment is worn by a person. It weighs at least 40 pounds, not including the headpiece. The total number of body and arm feathers is well over 500—I lost count after awhile. Pillow covers became shoulder pieces, a denim shirt remnant formed the bodice overlay, and a beaded collar completed the body of this garment. The glass beads were also part of the original centerpieces. The headpiece [not shown] is made from a bike helmet, mask, wig parts, paper, netting, and felt used on the backside to reduce the weight of additional paper.  Ceremonial dress is often overly elaborate and mostly un-functional, therefore I have succeeded!

 
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